MAD Perspectives Blog

The Power of Original Content

Peggy Dau - Monday, April 03, 2017

What did you watch on 'TV' last night? Did you watch it on your TV or on your device? Was it live, recorded or streaming? Actually, it doesn't matter. There is a lot of powerful original scripted content being created and delivered into our homes. Despite the rise of reality TV that is cheaper to produce, consumers are enjoying great dramatic series. Just look at the 2016 Emmys nominees for Best Drama:  Game of Thrones (winner), The Americans, House of Cards, Downton Abbey, Better Call Saul, Mr. Robot and Homeland. These series represent “addictive” content with passionate fans that consume each episode live and on-demand. 

Boston Consulting Group (BCG) has noted the rise of content creation in their September 2016 The Future of Television report. The report reflects upon the disruption of the Free-to-Air/Pay TV business model by the s Direct-to-Consumer (D2C) distribution of video via OTT channels. As OTT providers have grown in popularity, so has the demand for flexibility and volume of scripted content. While broadcast TV depends on a combination of scripted, sports and entertainment content, it is the entertainment programming that drives the bulk of broadcaster or Pay TV operator revenue. Additionally, BCG notes the increased value of top tier content, namely sports and scripted or unscripted entertainment content.

Content budgets are on the rise. Netflix has announced an anticipated spend of over $7B on original content creation in 2017. Amazon is on track for the same amount, while broadcasters NBC and CBS will each spend over $4B. It is the lifetime value of scripted content that is not only benefiting the producers and rights holders of that content, but also the consumer.

As a consumer, I find myself recording more broadcast programming even as I stream content online. For me it is about convenience. I can watch this season’s episodes of Scandal live or on-demand, based on my schedule. Or, I can binge watch past seasons of Scandal (as if I could wait that long!) on Netflix. However, content is big business for distributors and rights holders. The traditional broadcast revenue model is dependent on advertising, while content producers generate revenue from licensing. Often the broadcaster (e.g., CBS, NBC, ABC, FOX) is also the content producer. Top tier content creates greater long-term revenue than sub-par content.

Of course hugely popular content drives up advertising rates, but it also increases licensing revenue. While advertising revenue is tied to a specific broadcast season, licensing revenue is recurring. For example, the NBC hit Friends, which ran from 1994-2004, is still in syndication. Warner Brothers earns ~$1B per year in syndication rights for Friends. 

Accenture’s The Future of Broadcasting V report notes the economic value of original content. Broadcasters such as the UK’s ITV have shifted their revenue strategies to place more emphasis on content and reduce their dependency on advertising revenue. In 2008, advertising represented almost 69% of ITV’s revenue. By strategic investment in its content production subsidiary, ITV Studios, and acquiring other content production companies, ITV has increased both their domestic and international content licensing revenue. A focused content strategy has diversified their revenue flow and potentially improved their overall financial performance.

Accenture has also found that broadcasters who earn at least 20% of their revenue from content production and licensing outperform peers who rely on ad income alone. They achieve better capital efficiency and larger operating margins. It’s no wonder that content production is on the rise. Libraries of original scripted content not only improve long-term revenue projections, they send a message to consumers about the broadcaster’s commitment to providing their audience with quality content. 

Content IS King.

What's your perspective?





Recognizing the Signals

Peggy Dau - Monday, June 29, 2015

A fast paced world requires the ability to recognize the signals. Like Native American smoke signals, Morse code, or even a baseball managers swiping the rim of his hat, signals guide and alert us. Various forms of technology represent today’s signals. Whether they are social media, wearables, apps or platforms designed to monitor and measure – we are seeking signals to warn us of potential failures and to identify opportunities. This is why Big Data is so omnipresent – it is perceived as one method of identifying signals.

Broadband penetration in the U.S. has grown from 20% in 2004 to 79% in 2014 (Leichtman Research Group 2014), while broadband connection speeds have increased from 56Kbps in 2003 to and average of 11.1Mbps in 2015 (Akamai State of the Internet Report, May 2015).

Many a start-up will tell you that their foundation was based on spotting a gap (aka opportunity) in the market that they knew they could fill. The ability to create a new reality is called progress. Look at the adoption of social media. The grand daddy of social media, Facebook, has 1.44B monthly active users (MAU) based on their April 2015 earnings report.  That’s larger than the population of China. 70% of that MAU is mobile. That’s a signal.

When it comes to video, the power is shifting. YouTube was and still is the king of online video. Before YouTube online video was proprietary with inconsistent performance. The broadcast and cable industry did not consider online video a challenge or an opportunity. However, YouTube changed that by providing a user-friendly ability to upload AND view user-generated content. That’s a signal.

Facebook has entered the online video segment and is challenging YouTube for the all important ad dollars. The popularity of both platforms is not in question. The challenge will be who can better optimize the video experience, for both uploads and viewing, for the mobile audience. BTW, I’m defining the mobile audience as users viewing content on a tablet or smartphone via a Wi-Fi or 4G/LTE connection. Ooyala says that mobile now accounts for 42% of all online video viewing. That’s a signal.

What’s the next step in the progress of sharing and viewing video? For sure it is mobile? But what does that look like. What signals are we seeing from device manufacturers? Are you ready to watch TV on your smart watch?

What are the signals in your industry? How will financial services capitalize on tweets? Will railroads improve safety and optimize routes using communications and Internet of Things technologies? Will your car not only tell you that you need gas, but also the location of the closes gas station?  By paying attention to the signals that are shared every day, perhaps you can identify the next big idea!

What’s your perspective?




Clouds Taking Shape For Broadcast & Cable

Peggy Dau - Monday, June 08, 2015

Clouds are a good thing. Really. They are. Especially when they bring opportunity, flexibility and innovation. 

Cloud solutions are making the news on an increasingly regular basis. The M&A activity related to cloud technology is hot as companies throughout the media lifecycle look to the cloud to drive new business models. Whether it is in post-production, the newsroom or cable head-end, cloud is the word. Cloud computing has been the talk of the IT industry for almost 20 years, but it is thanks to Google and Amazon that the terminology, and the technology, is now part of our everyday conversation. Clouds, you remember them - those white fluffy things up in the sky, are flexible and ever shifting. This is the premise behind cloud computing - on demand access to technology resources.

As the media industry increasing adopts IP and IT technology to enable media workflows, live broadcast and content distribution, cloud provides opportunities. In all cases, the consideration of cloud is driven by the need for flexibility without incurring unnecessary cost. Examples of cloud solutions changing the shape of the broadcast and cable industries:

  • Workflows - From content ingest, to transcode, edit, QC, review, and syndication, cloud solutions enable production and post-production teams to collaborate without geographic boundary. Solutions, from vendors such as NativAframe and Forscene, deliver flexibility in orchestrating tasks, resources and people. They simplify upload of footage and stories from remote locations, accelerate the editing process,and improve collaboration. They integrate with established editing solutions, while also forcing those solutions to transition to the cloud themselves.

  • Newsroom - The fast pace of live news requires solutions that allow field reporters to easily upload footage, incorporate user generated content, capture social perspectives. Established newsroom vendors such as Avid and Dalet are now using the cloud to capture real-time content, share and modify rundowns and allow reporters to do what they do best - discover and tell the story.

Distribution - It could be said that the distribution and delivery of content is the original cloud solution. Back in the 1990's content delivery networks emerged to enable digital delivery of media content across IP networks. Akamai emerged as the kind of CDNs enabling services for a variety of online video providers such as Brightcove and media companies such as NBC, MTV and Discovery. However, CDN itself is changing as vendors such as Scality bring the combination of object storage and cloud together to address the storage demands of CDN origin and edge servers. Offloading the storage demands from the CDN to the cloud provides increased storage scalability and economic flexibility as content libraries grow.

Consumption - Cable operators recognize the demand from consumers to enjoy content when, where and how they want. The set-top box has long been the hub which controlled how consumers could watch content on-demand. However, Charter is changing the game with its stake in ActiveVideo. By pushing DVR functionality into the cloud, they increase storage capacity, unify processing functions and eliminate silos of technology specific to ingest, transcode and streaming. They can simplify content discovery and personalize EPGs without concern for the STB hardware. 

Across the media supply chain, vendors are changing the strategies to capitalize upon the cloud. Ericsson is a primary example of a traditional network equipment provider recognizing the future of TV. Through acquisition and R&D, Ericsson enables cloud solutions for: media processing and contribution; delivery of TV content with MediaFirst a software-defined, media-optimized platform enabling the next generation of PAY TV operators; time-shifting and viewing on any device with cloud DVR. 

Cloud computing, for media, offers opportunities to innovate and bring great stories to market more quickly. It provides greater flexibility in serving content as consumers demand it. And, most importantly it enables innovation and flexibility in cost-effective model. Cloud reduces hardware acquisition challenges while improving scalability, turns capital expenses into operating expenses, and frees up time to create service differentiation.

What's your perspective?

 



AOL's Pivot Results in a Match with Verizon

Peggy Dau - Monday, May 18, 2015


The big news last week was Verizon's acquisition of AOL. It's a little bit funny how one of the original Internet stalwarts has been punted around the media and telecom sector. Even as we remember that AOL inspired a movie based on a service that is considered irrelevant by some, many have forgotten that AOL still exists. Since AOL's spin-off from their disastrous merger with Time Warner, it has been focused on content and advertising.

Is there any other way, other than content, to be relevant and influence audience in these days of content everywhere? AOL made the decision to focus on content through acquisitions (TechCrunch, HuffPo), technology (adap.tv, Convertro) and community (20,000 bloggers). They've invested in content development, mobile platforms, video technology. As a result they have reach, influence and...data.

Why is all this interesting for Verizon? Verizon has been an enabler of content delivery to its subscribers for 20+ years. However, they've stepped up their game in recent years through their Digital Media Services group. Their capabilities help customers to prepare and manage video content for delivery to subscribers on broadband, WiFi or wireless networks. They provide the infrastructure that we all take for granted that delivers voice, data and TV services to our devices wherever they may be. But, Verizon doesn't own content. Some of their competitors do (e.g., Comcast, Cablevision). Verizon has the ability to reach it's customers in ways that these competitors cannot - they are a mobile network operator. Mobile is the future. And the future of mobile is content, whether it is informational, entertainment, or advertising.

Moreover, the benefit of mobile is increased volumes of contextual data. Verizon has a view of its subscribers through the data gleaned from subscription plans as well as user behavior while consuming content across TVs, tablets and smartphones. The content and ad technologies that come with the AOL acquisition are complementary to Verizon's Digital Media Services. They provide Verizon with the potential for creating original content, increase advertising revenue through multi-platform ad tech and enhanced data to define further revenue opportunities. The mobile data provides perspective on where and what an individual may be doing as they engage with content and ads on their mobile device. The appeal to brands is evident. Verizon is definitely growing its capabilities beyond being a mere pipe.

While AOL still offers email services, its original business of connecting consumers to the Internet is long dead. In fact, that service was displaced by companies like Verizon. However, AOL was savvy enough, over time, to adapt and pivot. They recognized the value of compelling content and the opportunity to monetize its consumption across multiple channels. As a result they've become highly attractive 

What's your perspective?




Data is the Legendary Needle in the Media's Haystack

Peggy Dau - Monday, May 11, 2015

Obtaining volumes of data can be a double edged sword. The media industry is embracing data, particularly consumer data, as the basis for validating investments and business models. Vendors at all stages of the media workflow are collecting data and emphasizing its value to their customers. But, collecting data without an understanding of how it will be used creates new problems, the least of which is storing all that data. The bigger challenge is figuring what they really want to learn from the data and then drive real, measurable value from it.

Imagine all the devices that now provide data: set-top boxes, tablets, smartphones, network routers, servers, storage....and more. Then consider all the data that is already surrounding any piece of media: descriptive metadata, licenses, contracts, schedules, algorithms...and more. And, we haven't even brought up the related social or digital data or the insights that are important to advertisers. There is data everywhere with just as many the vendors ready to help you collect it. And, they all directly or indirectly reference the all important consumer experience.

Even focusing on the consumer alone, means aggregating, correlating, and analyzing data from a plethora of resources. It's not enough to collect data from set-top boxes that reveals when and what a subscriber consumed. It's now a priority to assess their method and frequency of engagement with and around video. Content protection vendors will provide you with data to reinforce that derived from distribution channels. Did the subscriber start watching on one device and finish watching on another devices? How did they authenticate their access to content on their device of choice? How did this impact their level of engagement? The answers to these questions influence content production, scheduling, marketing, and advertising. Oh, and did I mention monetization?

Understanding preferred methods of engagement, will drive advertising models. What works on TV, does not work on a tablet nor on a smartphone. Yet, content must be monetized. It takes more than demographics to understand how to derive revenue for programming targeting the 18-24 year old audience. How does this audience respond to ad-supported content versus subscriptions? How do they discover the video programming?  As the saying goes, "it takes a village" to capture data from a variety of sources and develop conclusions that subsequently drive future actions. It may start with demographics, but the process quickly incorporates analysis of a variety of stimuli and resulting actions. What happened that caused a viewer to engage or disengage?

Defining what is needed from the data is critical. Is it about audience engagement or customer experience? Is it about content quality? Network performance? Ad buying? The more specific the goal, the better understanding of the right vendor to provide that data; and the more effective the data collection and analysis. Making sense of data can be like looking for a needle in the haystack. Is that how you want to define your strategy? Big data has the potential to help shape the future of the media industry, let's not forget that it's about more than simple data collection.

What's your perspective?



IP is the Future for Broadcast

Peggy Dau - Monday, May 04, 2015

My blogs the past few weeks have been discussing why big data matters and IP in the broadcast industry. The connection between these topics may not be obvious, but the point is that all data is critical to the ongoing success of the broadcast business, at every step throughout the creative, management, distribution and consumptions processes. The adoption of IP in the broadcast workflow is critical to obtaining data that will influence business decisions. Internet Protocol based networks provide a volume of data that informs and complements data obtained from other sources.

The use of IP is about more than delivery of content to the consumer home, it's about migrating the operational infrastructure for broadcast. This migration will take years, and broadcasters will likely deploy IP alongside existing SDI components until this components no longer function. However, like the telecommunications industry before it, the broadcast industry will benefit from the flexibility and insight provided by IP networks. These networks have been utilized, for years, to enable creative collaboration amongst editing teams, to interconnect business solutions to manage resources, supply chain, and facilitate the management of rights, licenses and contracts. But, IP did not penetrate the broadcast control room. It was acceptable behind the scenes, but it was not deemed reliable enough for live broadcast. 

Like all technologies, IP has evolved. The pressure is on for broadcasters to create more with less. The TV industry at large is going through monumental changes as an increasing volume of content is consumed online. This does mean that TV dead, merely that the business model is changing. As a result, broadcasters must become more nimble. This means adopting technology that is more cost effective and allows greater flexibility. IP networking is one element. Network providers like Cisco, have been penetrating the media value chain for years. They have long had a presence in cable head-ends. Now their opportunity expands to broadcast operations. Cisco was omnipresent at the recent NAB show with demos and announcements with Grass Valley, EVS, MLBAM, Imagine Communications, Globo, Adobe, Elemental, Signiant, Interra and Snell - reinforcing the relevance of IP to the future of broadcasting.

And, what about data? Well, solutions have long existed to monitor, manage and analyze IP networks and whatever devices are resident within them or attached to them. The introduction of IP networks into control rooms opens the door wider for software based solutions running on industry standard hardware. IP networks contain volumes of data about the effectiveness and efficiency of operational environments. IP networks are already providing audience insight with data about consumer behavior. They are also at the heart of analytics solutions capturing data from traffic systems, advertising platforms or rights management solutions. IP is at the heart of monetization strategies from enablement of workflows to the delivery of content to the aggregation of data. 

The roadmap for broadcast must include IP if only for the flexibility and scalability that it enables. But equally importantly for the interoperability it enables between creative, operational and distribution platforms - providing a true end-to-end perspective through the data aggregated at every point of the media supply chain.

What's your perspective?



Enjoyment at the Intersection of Broadcast, IT and IP

Peggy Dau - Monday, April 27, 2015



Complementing broadcast content with IP delivery and relevant data is the name of the game for audience engagement. Nowhere was this more evident than at the EVS booth at NAB this year. I first checked out EVS's adoption of IP a few years, when they launched C-Cast. This cloud based platform allows live content producers to expand the reach and relevance of their content by enabling delivery to any device, while enriching the broadcast content with data, social updates and graphics.

This year EVS took a big step forward with its focus on the #ReturnOnEmotion and a related developer contest. EVS itself has leveraged C-Cast in its FanCast solution which changes the in-stadium experience. Wherever fans are in the stadium, in their seats, seeking refreshments or in hospitality suites, they are able to enjoy live or near-live content on big screens or small screens.

Prior to NAB, EVS launched a contest inviting developers to augment C-Cast capabilities. The contest prize - the ability to demo their capabilities at NAB in the EVS booth. Brilliant marketing by EVS. Not only did they enhance their solution portfolio, but they enabled developers who otherwise would not be able to afford a presence at NAB, the opportunity to showcase their solutions.

Each solution reflected innovation at the intersection of broadcast, IT and IP. The foundation, is C-Cast, which EVS. All of the solutions leverage C-Cast capabilities to provide fun and engaging sports experiences.  

1. LiveLike - developed an blended live sport with virtual reality allowing viewers to step "into" the game with the ability to select different camera angles. For the sports fan who cannot be at the stadium, this is a truly engaging experience. I admit it was my first VR experience and I'm a fan! I can easily imagine avid fans adopting VR goggles and services to bring a new dimension to viewing their favorite teams. Honestly, I know kids who would have been fighting to use this technology during last years FIFA World Cup!

2. ChirpVision - brings mobile to life for in-stadium fans. Their fault-tolerant video streaming, with a less than 1 second delay, sets the stage for live or on-demand viewing of the sporting event. A clean, mobile-friendly, user interface, allows users to select camera angles, check social network activity, and enjoy VOD functionality such as rewind, pause and fast-forward. But, for ChirpVision, it's also about providing brands with a new channel for reaching fans. Their solution allows monetization of the video streams through display and video ad insertion.

3. Playrz - developed by Intellicore, is a fan centric app aggregating data and social content to augment live and on-demand video streams. Fans can find data pertinent to the real-time activity on the field. They can review and compare stats about teams and players, replay plays from different camera angles and interact with other fans. Already utilized at the FIBA (International Basketball Association) World Cup last year, Playrz gives the sports fan easy access to the information they crave during a game.

Seeing this intersection of technologies was compelling. Sports often leads the way in adopting and validating emerging broadcast technologies. And, EVS has long been engaged in delivery broadcast solutions to the sports market. However, they are taking their efforts to a new level by acknowledging the demands of the fans whether they are at home or in the stadium. By enabling content to be repurposed, in real-time, for consumption on IP enabled devices, with the added value provided by integration of statistical data and social feeds, EVS and their partners are helping sports teams, leagues and brands create richer fan experiences.  What fun!

What's your perspective?



Making Data Matter

Peggy Dau - Monday, April 06, 2015


It really is the overarching conversation across all business sectors. Data. It's always been there, but we seem to have fallen in love with data all over again. We've been using it since we were in elementary school. We've collected it at every point in our life. We absorbed data about which friend liked the same sports team or what color shirt they wore or what time they ate dinner. We align ourselves with those of similar interests and seek out those with opposing opinions, if only to debate or educate.

Completion of our education did not stop the data deluge, it only changed its form. In fact, some of use decided to become analysts or scientists that steeped themselves in using data in new and fascinating ways. We are no longer memorizing multiplication tables or historic dates, nor are we organizing arguments to support theses. Now we are absorbing data about our industry and its people, processes, products, technologies, tools and communication methods. We manage a LOT of it instinctively. However, the rise of BIG data reinforces the relevance of data and the technology industry for all sectors, whether they are financial services, healthcare, consumer products, hospitality, travel, manufacturing, environmental - ok, you get it. Big data is applicable and pertinent for all industries.

But, how do we make all that data matter? I collect data points every day as I work with clients to develop strategies and content that reflects their value to their target customers. This means understanding their customers' needs, communicating in a manner that resonates with the customer, while still reflecting the key attributes of my client's technology. It's not always easy finding and collecting the right data. All that data doesn't always makes sense. It can be confusing.

This is why we are now seeing the focus grow beyond data collection and analytics. We're going to learn a lot about predictive and prescriptive analytics in the coming months. These are the magic 8 balls of the big data industry, thus far. They are fortune telling at their current best. If we can anticipate the needs and behavior of our customers, we can improve how we address and fulfill them. We can adapt business processes, modify go-to-market models, refine marketing and ultimately, improve revenue and profit margins.

That's the holy grail - make the data matter. But it's just not that easy. I have technology clients managing data, analyzing data, manipulating data and making recommendations borne from data. In the media sector, Nielsen reports data about what we watch. Ooyala shares data about how we watch. Cisco reports about how many bits move across networks. Bay area start-up Guavas provides data on the health of those networks. These are all indicators that should be acted upon. We are all awash in data and I, for one, am eager to see how we make this data really matter for business customers and consumers.

What's your perspective?



Consumer Tools Inspiring B2B

Peggy Dau - Monday, March 23, 2015


I've lived in a B2B world my entire career. Sure, some of the products manufactured by my employers end up in the hands of consumers, but my positions were always focused on the enterprise. My concerns were always about how business would deploy and utilize products. My interest was and continues to be how to deliver solutions that solve a business challenge. In the past, many of the technologies developed for business, were adapted for consumer use. 

However, we've moved past a key tipping point where consumer behavior is actively influencing enterprise solutions. I don't mean their buying behavior. I mean the dramatic shift in how we as individuals share and consume content. Social networks evolved as consumer centric platforms to connect students and friends. Each new social network that emerges is focused on what millennials and Generation Z want to share. Is it text, images, video? Where and how do they want to share it? Are they concerned about privacy? Yes? No?

As each social platform emerges (hello Meerkat!), we are exposed to yet another method of communicating. For businesses, the lesson is to understand which of these methods makes sense given their productions and solutions, and most importantly, the needs and behaviors of their audience. Landor predicts 2015 as the year that B2B trumps B2C in social media. In what year will the volume of B2B apps surpass B2C apps?

Enterprise applications, such as CRM or ERP, are all under the gun to become apps. The difference being in how users interface with these enterprise critical applications. New businesses are emerging that offer these functionalities and others as apps. They must be accessible on the employee device of choice (BYOD, yet another sign of the consumer impact on the enterprise) and provide the required information on demand, while also allowing for content upload.

If you think this it is crazy that a consumer centric solution can change enterprise behavior, look at how hiring and recruiting models are being turned on their heads thanks to LinkedIn. Or, how Salesforce.com differentiated itself with integrations to Facebook and Twitter and then incorporated social monitoring and sharing.

I've heard arguments that these consumer inspired tools are not relevant. I've heard the statement "oh, i don't need to worry about that - i work in an office." But I will hazard a guess that even with many of the big tech companies pulling employees back into the office, the demand for ease of use, ease of access and ease of sharing, will not dissipate. If you want to know the future of how corporate america will function, pay attention to consumer trends!

What's your perspective?



Data Lessons Learned From Sports Broadcasting

Peggy Dau - Wednesday, December 17, 2014

I attended the Sports Video Group Summit with a client this week. SVG as indicated by its name, focuses on the business and technology of creating and distributing sports content. Everyone is a sports fan at some level. That doesn't mean you participate in fantasy leagues or count down the moment until the next SportsCenter broadcast, but it does mean you might have kids participating in soccer, swimming, gymnastics or even fencing and archery. 

Sports is all about the statistics. Sure, you thought it was about athleticism. But think about it - avid sports fans can reel off volumes of statistics in the form of batting averages, rushing yards, split times, win/loss records, etc. Those stats are data. Sports is flooded with data and those fans who participate in fantasy leagues, live for the data. However, what about those fans who just want to enjoy a game on TV? Do they love the stats? Do they love seeing their screen covered with mounds of data?

This was part of the conversation at this week's SVG Summit. As live sports producers consider the technology available to them (e.g., 4K cameras that allow them to show you the sweat on the lineman's brow) graphics is a big part of how  sports broadcasting has evolved. Graphics highlight boundaries, player movements, optimal trajectories, and they are the tool to portray data (aka statistics) on air.

It's no wonder that large screen TVs are popular, you need a large screen just to incorporate all that data! The question is - does all that data enhance the fan experience? Is the data complementary or intrusive? Producers have to make decisions about how the event is portrayed. Directors make decisions about camera angles. Producers own the look, feel and context. Yep, context.

Sports broadcasting is storytelling in a, usually, fast paced environment.  Decisions are made about how to add data that provides context to a given moment. This is contextual data. In the retail space this is data about where you might be as a consumer about to make a purchase. In sports productions, this is data that illuminates the viewers understanding of what just happened (or is about to happen) on the field of play. 

The challenge is to avoid crossing the line where the data becomes intrusive and no longer enhances the experience. This is a lesson we can all learn from, data is fantastic when we have a well-defined reason for collecting and analyzing it. Data for the sake of data is overwhelming, and perhaps a bit boring. When there is intention and context, data becomes insightful, helpful and hopefully - actionable.

What's your perspective?